Posts Tagged ‘Psyche’

Lassnig 1998

Art and Jungian Psychology Poll

Thank you for participating in our poll! Please let us know your thoughts below and for more captivating conversation about the art and Jungian Psychology join us on July 27th for the next installment in our “At Home with Jung: The Zurich Series” titled Art and the Psyche. Lucienne Marguerat plans to explore what visual art does to everyone and why this “moving” experience does not leave people unchanged, why it has in fact the same capacity as music to open everyone’s psychic space to humanity and the universe. As an illustration of this Lucienne will examine a few works by 2 different artists, Adolf Wölfli and Maria Lassnig. Linda Carter plans to show the deep importance of the conjunction of art and psyche in the collective as well as in individuals. These conjunctions create new life within artwork and the powerful dynamics of emergence.

Space for this online event is limited. Please register soon to make sure you able to see the live event. Click Here for more information

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Placing Psyche: The Future of Psychology

 The White Man’s Burden

Rudyard Kipling

Take up the White Man’s burden–

Send forth the best ye breed–

Go bind your sons to exile

To serve your captives’ need;

To wait in heavy harness,

On fluttered folk and wild–

Your new-caught, sullen peoples,

Half-devil and half-child.

Take up the White Man’s burden–

In patience to abide,

To veil the threat of terror

And check the show of pride;

By open speech and simple,

An hundred times made plain

To seek another’s profit,

And work another’s gain.

Take up the White Man’s burden–

The savage wars of peace–

Fill full the mouth of Famine

And bid the sickness cease;

And when your goal is nearest

The end for others sought,

Watch sloth and heathen Folly

Bring all your hopes to nought.

Take up the White Man’s burden–

No tawdry rule of kings,

But toil of serf and sweeper–

The tale of common things.

The ports ye shall not enter,

The roads ye shall not tread,

Go mark them with your living,

And mark them with your dead.

Take up the White Man’s burden–

And reap his old reward:

The blame of those ye better,

The hate of those ye guard–

The cry of hosts ye humour

(Ah, slowly!) toward the light:–

“Why brought he us from bondage,

Our loved Egyptian night?”

Take up the White Man’s burden–

Ye dare not stoop to less–

Nor call too loud on Freedom

To cloke your weariness;

By all ye cry or whisper,

By all ye leave or do,

The silent, sullen peoples

Shall weigh your gods and you.

Take up the White Man’s burden–

Have done with childish days–

The lightly proferred laurel,

The easy, ungrudged praise.

Comes now, to search your manhood

Through all the thankless years

Cold, edged with dear-bought wisdom,

The judgment of your peers!

Placing Psyche

The Future of Analytical Psychology and the World

 

During the last decade of the twentieth century there arose a chorus praising free trade and almost deifying globalization.  During the first decade of the twentieth first century, while the West waged war on two fronts, a different chorus emerged to praise the democratizing effect the West was having on other nations and cultures.  A recent Wall Street Journal editorial titled “Why the World Needs America” rejects the notion of a “post-American” era. It exposes widely accepted assumptions that sound eerily like Rudyard Kipling’s published in 1899. (see  http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052970203646004577213262856669448.html )  One of these assumptions that is easily overlooked by North Americans is that “America” denotes the region encompassing North America, Central America, and South America (unless you are an English-speaking inhabitant of the “United States of America”).   On Saturday, February 25, from 12:30 to 4:30 PM (EST) we are privileged to host a Webinar titled “The Future of Analytical Psychology and the World” with two extraordinary presenter, Tom Singer, MD and Craig San Roque, Ph.D.  Singer is the editor of a recently released book, “Placing Psyche: Exploring Cultural Complexes in Australia” and San Roque contributes to the Introduction and two chapters.  This is the first in a series of books that Spring Journal, Inc plans to publish as explorations of the notion of cultural complexes.  It manages to strike a balance between the unique and particular aspects of Australia and the universal, archetypal patterns associated with place.  Singer defines a cultural complex as “an autonomous, largely unconscious, emotionally charged aggregate of memories, affects, ideas, and behaviors that tend to cluster around an archetypal core and are shared by individuals in a group.”   The authors focus upon the regions “in-between” where tension emerges. This is one feature of their examination of cultural complexes.  The in-between space can refer to in-between ethnic, racial, religious, gender, and linguistic groups.  Consider the hotly debated issues of immigration across the southern border of the United States of America or immigration and fee passage across borders within the European Union, tow issues that highlight the tension that exists at the in-between spaces of national borders.  Even among groups some might perceive as uniform we observe in-between spaces fraught with tension.  To the Judeo-Christian Western individual, Islam may seem uniform but the space in-between Sunni and Shiite Muslims is overflowing with tension and unconscious cultural complex.   What is so compelling about this exploration of cultural complexes is that a dialogue about such complexes might free us from over-identifying with them or acting them out.  The individual complexes that a person fails to engage tend to usurp power and produce a constant interfering (neurotic) background for the psyche.  Conscious contact with a complex releases us from bondage, a bondage we scarcely recognize exists.  A fish may be unable to consider itself as a fish in water but a human being can endeavor to examine herself in the watery milieu of her cultural complexes.  (Take note if the change of pronoun to the feminine gender had any effect.)   Jung suggests that unconscious complexes produce a sort of automatism whereas when they become conscious “… they can be corrected.” (The Nature of the Psyche) A parallel is easily drawn for the cultural complex.  While it remains unconscious, it is capable of exerting a sort of automatic influence over the individual member of a group.  As it comes into consciousness, it can be corrected.  What we mean by “corrected” in this context is a fertile area of exploration as well.   An individual is less likely to identify with consciously engaged cultural.  Consciously engaged complexes are not as readily acted.   We are capable of being possessed by unconscious complexes and likewise, unconscious cultural complexes are capable of “possessing” large numbers of individual members of a group.  While I do not think a whole group is possessed, when sufficient numbers of individual members become possessed by a cultural complex it appears the group itself is possessed.   During the twentieth century, analytical psychology provided almost inexhaustible tools for the individuation process.  Individuation, that process of psychological integration that flowers in the fullness of an individual personality (psyche), can be extended to include the integration of our individual self with the group, humanity,  and the natural world.  A psyche disconnected from the ecological, interconnected biosphere has further to go.  A psyche that is incapable of enduring the tension of the many in-between spaces it encounters will tend adopt a default position identified with one polarity or another; this is an inherently less integrated state.  “Placing Psyche” and tomorrow’s conference is an invitation to the next stage in the individuation process, one that transcends individual psychology through a new lens of cultural complexes..   Singer and San Roque have chosen a fitting title for their conference, The Future of Analytical Psychology and the World,   It is being presented at the C. G. Jung Institute of San Francisco.  Anyone fortunate enough to be within commuting distance to the institute may want to consider registering at http://thefutureofanalyticalpsychology.eventbrite.com/  The Asheville Jung Center is honored to be able to participate in this conference as a Webinar and registration for the Webinar is available at http://ashevillejungcenter.org/webinars/sanfransisc/registration/  limited seating is still available for this conference that can be heard over the internet, by telephone, and through subsequent download.  Continuing education credits are also available for this conference.   by Len Cruz, MD

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In Memoriam: James Hillman

James Hillman died on Wednesday, October 27, 2011.  He was more than an interpreter of C. G. Jung’s work, he was a pioneer and explorer who extended Jung’s work in highly original, approachable ways.  His contributions were so extensive they could have filled the vessel of several lives.  He was educated at the Sorbonne in Paris and Trinity College in Dublin.  Following graduation from the C.G. Jung Institute, he served as Director of Studies for a decade and then became editor of Spring Publication.  But the acorn within James Hillman would burst forth and the oak took root in a larger, plebeian realm.  He became a bestselling author. Hillman was such a gifted writer that he was nominated for a Pulitzer Prize for Re-visioning Psychology (1975).  The Soul’s Code (1997) established a firm foundation for archetypal psychology within the human potential movement.  If modern psychology overemphasized a scientific, rational, egoistic approach, then Hillman can be credited with revitalizing the psyche or soul.  Myth, metaphor, and poetry figured prominently in Hillman’s works and therapy becames artistic creation.  For Hillman the dream was revelation, “…dreams tell us where we are, not what to do.” Hillman’s influence will reverberate for a very long time.  He invited us to grow down while we endeavor to grow up. It was given to James Hillman to bring us back to the ancient notion of the daimon. Across the world there are people who were touched by James Hillman who will mourn his death.  His courageous, sustained willingness to pursue his daimons provides us a precious example.  He struck out anew many times.   It seems fitting to offer a few lines from Tennyson’s Ulysses as an homage. Though much is taken, much abides; and though We are not now that strength which in old days Moved earth and heaven; that which we are, we are; One equal temper of heroic hearts, Made weak by time and fate, but strong in will To strive, to seek, to find, and not to yield. When people like Steve Jobs, Princess Diana, or Mother Teresa pass, there is an enormous outpouring of emotion.  James Hillman’s passing will evoke an outpouring of emotion and perhaps it will also provoke an enormous inpouring too.  One way we might pay our respects to James Hillman is to redouble our efforts to grow down as we honor the unique journey of awakening and individuation that belongs to each of us to reveal.  May his family and loved ones, his students, and his friends find comfort and inspiration in this time of loss. Len Cruz, MD, ME The New York Times article on James Hillman.  http://www.nytimes.com/2011/10/28/health/james-hillman-therapist-in-mens-movement-dies-at-85.html?scp=1&sq=James%20Hillman&st=cse

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